How evaluators adapt their evaluations to the developmental context: Evaluation approach

As mentioned previously, developmentally appropriate evaluation requires a culturally appropriate evaluation in the context of youth programs. This means including youth, or at minimum those with knowledge and experience working with youth, in the evaluation.

In my study, I asked practicing evaluators to describe the levels of involvement there would be across a wide range of stakeholders including school administrators, teachers, parents, program staff, program designers, district personnel, funders, developmental consultants, math consultants, and the tutors and tutees of the program. In particular, I was interested in the levels of involvement of the consultants, the tutors, and the tutees across the evaluators randomly assigned to the child, adolescent, or adult conditions.

Overall, evaluators were less likely to involve tutees in the child condition than the adolescent condition, and evaluators in both conditions were less likely to involve tutees than evaluators in the adult condition. Evaluators were also less likely to involve tutors in the child condition (as a reminder, the tutors in this condition are adolescents) than evaluators in the adult condition. There were no differences in use of consultants across the conditions.

One could argue that some evaluators have the knowledge and expertise required to conduct a culturally appropriate youth program evaluation. Thus, I also examined the extent to which their knowledge and expertise moderated the differences. Evaluators in the Youth Focused Evaluation TIG (a TIG focused on youth participatory evaluation) were most likely to involve beneficiaries than non-youth evaluation TIG members and members in the PreK-12 TIG were least likely to involve beneficiaries. Furthermore, evaluators with more self-reported developmental expertise were less likely to involve beneficiaries.

These results suggest that evaluators are less likely to involve beneficiaries of the program when they are children and adolescents than when they are adults. Evaluators were exposed to the same exact program, with the only difference being the age of beneficiaries.

Stay tuned for more results from my study in terms of the evaluation design and evaluation methods, as well as a discussion explaining these results and next steps!

2 thoughts on “How evaluators adapt their evaluations to the developmental context: Evaluation approach

  1. This is really great, Dana. I’ve been thinking more about cultural responsiveness in evaluation within the context of youth, and how we as evaluators can promote youth-adult partnerships when we work with stakeholders. The question I’m wondering next is how can we get adults (and evaluators) on board with being ok with youth (especially younger children) having a seat at the stakeholder table. Great post and I’m looking forward to the rest of the study results.

    1. Thank you Nicole! I totally agree; it’s a huge barrier that I think expands beyond just evaluators. Adults think they know best and while they may in some contexts for some youth, promoting youth voice in our work is so critical!

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