Can evaluators be the bridge in the research-practice gap?

Researchers and practitioners agree that there is a gap between research (or theory) and practice. While the reasons for this gap are plentiful, they boil down to researchers and practitioners comprising two communities (Caplan, 1979) such that have different languages, values, reward systems, and priorities. The two communities try to bridge the gap through a variety of methods including producer-push models (e.g., knowledge transfer, knowledge translation, dissemination, applied research, interdisciplinary scholarship), user-pull models (e.g., evidence-based practice, practitioner inquiry, action research), and exchange models (e.g., research-practice partnerships and collaboratives, knowledge brokers, intermediaries). However, these methods typically focus on researchers or practitioners and do not consider other scholars that could fill this role. Continue reading “Can evaluators be the bridge in the research-practice gap?”

Evaluation is Not Applied Research

What is the difference between evaluation and research, especially applied research? For some, they are one and the same. Evaluation and research use the same methods, write the same types of reports, and come to the same conclusions. Evaluation is often described as applied research. For instance, here are some recent quotes describing what evaluation is: “Evaluation is applied research that aims to assess the worth of a service.” (Barker, Pistrang, & Elliott, 2016). “Program evaluation is applied research that asks practical questions and is performed in real-life situations.” (Hackbarth & Gall, 2005), and the current editor of the American Journal of Evaluation saying that “evaluation is applied research.” (Rallis, 2014). This is confusing for introductory evaluation students, particularly those coming from a research background or studying evaluation at a research institution. Continue reading “Evaluation is Not Applied Research”